Our Maple Tree

Keeping up with The Maples

I Left My Heart in San Francisco – Part 3

| Leave a comment

Day Two:

We started our day much like the first, breakfast at the Grove. I told you this place was amazing!

IMG_3757

 

IMG_3758

Next was the adventure of the bus system. So in San Francisco, their buses don’t quite run like ones we have used before. And the bus schedule online does not match up to what happens in real life. After trying to find a bus to take us to the Golden Gate Bridge for about an hour, we decided to walk to the bridge. Probably not the brightest idea we ever had. But alas, we saw a lot of the city on foot, which was nice. All in all, it was about an 8 mile hike from where we started to the middle of the bridge. We started taking pictures when we could see the bridge, which you can see from a long, long way off. 🙂 (San Francisco is much bigger than it is on the map, FYI.)

DSC_7711

Quote from Carl Sandburg, ” The fog comes on little cat feet. It sits looking over the harbor and city on silent haunches, and then moves on.” His house is near where we live so when we saw this stone, we were like, “I know him!” Nerds to core! Note: That was a movie quote, in case no one caught that. 

DSC_7723

 

DSC_7727

 

DSC_7730

 

And we kept walking.

And we walked some more.

And some more.

And just when I didn’t think I could walk any further, we made it to the Golden Gate Bridge.

DSC_7761

The Golden Gate Bridge has to be one of my favorite engineering marvels. Construction started in 1933 and the bridge was opened in 1937. Just 4 years, 4 years! That is incredible! At the time, it was the world’s largest suspension bridge and constructed across a very treacherous strait. It was Joseph Strauss who came up with the design of the bridge in the 1920’s – all with a pencil and a notebook. Pretty impressive!

DSC_7762

As you can see, it is quite busy on the bridge. Word of advice: Beware of local bikers on the pedestrian walkway. There are two lanes on the walkway, one for bikers and one for walkers. Problem is that there are many, many walkers and many tourists on bikes. So when you are doing your best to walk along your designated path and avoiding tourists on bikes who don’t know what they are doing; all of sudden you will have to jump to safety as a local comes zooming down the walkway all the while yelling at you to get out of the way.

DSC_7764

Below the bridge is a Civil War Era fort. Construction of the fort began in 1853 and it took 8 years to complete this fort. The fort had it’s first cannon mounted in 1861 and the Civil War ended in 1865. Needless to say, this fort saw very little action.

DSC_7765

You can’t really understand how large this bridge is until you stand on it, looking up towards the top. I cannot begin to explain how large this bridge is. It is amazing!

 

 

DSC_7768

 

DSC_7774

 

DSC_7777

 

DSC_7782

 

IMG_3722

 

DSC_7772

 

IMG_3727

I wanted to across the bridge to Sausalito, but by the time we got to the middle of the bridge, we were exhausted (8 mile mark at this point). We finally figured out the bus system and went to dinner.

Randy took me to a restaurant called, The Stinking Rose. Everything about this restaurant is about garlic… everything. They have garlic hanging from the ceiling, you can buy garlic infused everything, and everything on the menu has garlic in it. Warning: We reeked of garlic for about 12 hours after this dinner!

IMG_3738

IMG_3742

We ordered their Garlic Hot Tub, which is a small skillet of roasted garlic cloves swimming in olive oil and spices. The garlic cloves are so soft that when you put it on your bread, it spreads like butter. It was delicious!

IMG_3736

After dinner we took a cable car back to our hotel and watched the sunset. We were so tired, we literally could not go anymore. We had a great day and I loved walking across the Golden Gate Bridge. It truly is an amazing feat of engineering and one of my favorite things we did in San Francisco.

IMG_3749

IMG_3752

Stayed tuned for our trip to The Golden Gate Bridge Park!

 

Leave a Reply